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January 4, 2017
Fewer than one in five American adults has current training in CPR, and that rate is even lower among older adults, a new study finds. Immediate CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) after sudden cardiac arrest can double or triple a person’s chances of survival. In cardiac arrest, a person’s heart suddenly stops beating. A telephone survey of more than 9,000 adults 18 and older found that only 18 percent were currently trained in CPR . About 65 percent said they had received CPR training at some time. “Cardiac arrest occurs among people in their 50s and 60s, and most cardiac arrests occur in the home, yet that is the population that is poorly trained or has not kept up with current training,” said senior study author Dr. Benjamin Abella. If a key link in the chain of survival with cardiac arrest is the bystander response — including use of automatic external defibrillators and delivery of CPR — then much work is needed, Abella said in an AHA news release. “We really need to better understand what gets bystanders to act, what gets bystanders to learn and refresh their CPR skills and the current ways to seek training in any given community,” Abella added. Asked what they would do if they witnessed a cardiac arrest, 85 percent of respondents said they would be willing to call the EMS.  Roughly 35 percent would provide rescue breaths, chest compressions or use an automated

Posted in Blog by twila
September 22, 2016

We R CPR is proud to support Comfort Keepers Feed Seniors Now Food Drive  in partnership with @Chattanooga Area Food Bank September 19-30. Stop by We R CPR and drop off non perishable food item OR donate on line using the Chattanooga Food Bank Virtual Shopper. Please mention when asked if you have a special purpose for your donations, just add “Comfort Keepers Food Drive” AT THIS LINK: https://donatenow.networkforgood.org/chattfoodbank

Posted in Uncategorized by twila
February 1, 2016

True or False? Every year, 1 in 4 deaths are caused by heart disease? TRUE! Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. Learn to save a life, learn CPR.  The Life you SAVE could be that of a loved one.

Posted in Uncategorized by twila
October 30, 2015
Halloween is a favorite holiday for many children, but it’s one that can make Mom and Dad a little nervous. Today’s HSI blog offers up some tips for parents on how to handle the costumes that might impair vision, the sharp pumpkin carving knives, and the worry about having the kids out in the dark.

Masters of Disguise

When it comes to costumes, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) offers the following suggestions on their website:

  • Plan costumes that are bright and reflective. Make sure that shoes fit well and that costumes are short enough to prevent tripping, entanglement or contact with flame.
  • Consider adding reflective tape or striping to costumes and trick-or-treat bags for greater visibility.
  • Because masks can limit or block eyesight, consider non-toxic makeup and decorative hats as safer alternatives. Hats should fit properly to prevent them from sliding over eyes.
  • When shopping for costumes, wigs and accessories look for and purchase those with a label clearly indicating they are flame resi

Posted in Uncategorized by twila
October 1, 2015

Do you know the difference between cardiac arrest and a heart attack?

What is cardiac arrest?

When cardiac arrest strikes, the heart stops. Completely! This is due to an electrical malfunction in the heart that results in an irregular heart beat and the heart being unable to pump blood to the rest of the body. Symptoms of cardiac arrest come on very suddenly. A victim of cardiac arrest will immediately become unresponsive, and without treatment, death can occur within minutes.

What can to you do to help?

• Call 911

• Perform high-quality CPR, pushing hard and fast on the chest to help move blood through the heart into the rest of the body.

• Use an automated external defibrillator (AED), if it’s available, and administer a shock if necessary.

What is a heart attack?

Oct- Sudden Cardiac Arrest Awareness Month

October 1, 2015

Do you know the difference between cardiac arrest and a heart attack?

What is cardiac arrest?

When cardiac arrest strikes, the heart stops. Completely! This is due to an electrical malfunction in the heart that results in an irregular heart beat and the heart being unable to pump blood to the rest of the body. Symptoms of cardiac arrest come on very suddenly. A victim of cardiac arrest will immediately become unresponsive, and without treatment, death can occur within minutes.

What can to you do to help?

• Call 911

• Perform high-quality CPR, pushing hard and fast on the chest to help move blood through the heart into the rest of the body.

• Use an automated external defibrillator (AED), if it’s available, and administer a shock if necessary.

What is a heart attack?

CPR is as easy as C-A-B

September 2, 2015

If you need to save a life, just press on the chest fast and hard In a major 2010 change, the American Heart Association said that rapid, deep presses on the chest of an adult cardiac arrest victim until help arrives, works just as well as standard CPR for one lay rescuer. Experts hope bystanders now will be more willing to jump in and help if they see someone collapse. Hands-only CPR is simpler and easier to remember and removes a big barrier for people skittish about mouth-to-mouth breathing. You only have to Call 911 and push hard and fast on the middle of the victim’s chest. Hands only CPR for lay rescuer calls for: Uninterrupted chest compressions 100 times a minute, until EMS workers take over or an automated external defibrillator is available to restore a normal heart rhythm. This action should be taken only for adults who unexpectedly collapse, stop breathing and are unresponsive. Most likely that the person is having cardiac arrest.

Posted in CPR by werpcr