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April 2, 2018

Nearby climbing routes, campsites and hiking spots make Chattanooga a prime location for adventuring, which is why We R CPR is adding Wilderness Training to its lineup of first aid classes.

While Chattanooga’s outdoor community is thriving, few people may actually be trained in responding to a crisis in the outdoors, said Cole Lowery and Tyler Ellis, We R CPR wilderness first aid instructors.

Chattanooga’s We R CPR is growing as it…

Photo by Contributed Photo /Times Free Press.

The Wilderness Training class spans two days and goes for eight hours each day. At $125 per person, Becky Blaesing, marketing consultant for We R CPR, said the class is affordable and has the added benefit of being local. Similar classes in Atlanta and Nashville run upwards of $200, Blaesing said.

The course is a mixture of textbook and experiential learning designed to give participants hands-on experience with the material.

Lowery and Ellis encourage everyone to take the class, regardless of their familiarity or experience with the outdoors. The two said they work to tailor the class to the individuals participating by asking about prior experience with the outdoors and what situations they have encountered to ensure relevance.

“What sets it aside from any other first aid class is that it teaches you different skills you would use in the wild for first aid,” Lowery said. “We take our students and run them through [different] scenarios.”

Simulations might include how to take care of someone who broke their leg. In that example, Lowery and Ellis would take students out, train them how to splint the leg and how to get the wounded person safely to the care they need.

The class covers everything from basic first aid to how to handle more serious injuries, like a fractured skull or other broken bones, they said. Students also learn about local plant life, poisonous animals, and treating stings and bites.

“There has to be some type of training above just band-aids and boo-boos,” said Ellis.

He and Lowery are passionate about educating Chattanoogans to have strong wilderness first aid skills. They both grew up in the outdoors and got certified to ensure their own safety during their adventures.

Blaesing stressed the importance of self-reliance and not depending on one person in a group with knowledge or experience on wilderness first aid, a trap many fall into, she said.

“If that person gets injured and they’re unconscious, what are you going to do?” said Blaesing. “It really targets everyday people who like to be outdoors.”

Lowery and Ellis said the class has received positive feedback and most people walk away with new skills and knowledge.

We R CPR currently holds the classes the first Friday and Saturday of each month beginning at 8:30 a.m., but is considering additional classes to meet growing demand. Classes are held at Audubon Acres, 900 N. Sanctuary Road.

To register for Wilderness Training or for more information, visit wercpr.com. Registration can also be done via phone at 553-0400. Register in advance.

Email Kaitlin Colon at kcolon@timesfreepress.com.

Posted in Uncategorized by twila
January 4, 2017

Fewer than one in five American adults has current training in CPR, and that rate is even lower among older adults, a new study finds.

Immediate CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) after sudden cardiac arrest can double or triple a person’s chances of survival. In cardiac arrest, a person’s heart suddenly stops beating.

A telephone survey of more than 9,000 adults 18 and older found that only 18 percent were currently trained in CPR . About 65 percent said they had received CPR training at some time.

“Cardiac arrest occurs among people in their 50s and 60s, and most cardiac arrests occur in the home, yet that is the population that is poorly trained or has not kept up with current training,” said senior study author Dr. Benjamin Abella.

If a key link in the chain of survival with cardiac arrest is the bystander response — including use of automatic external defibrillators and delivery of CPR — then much work is needed, Abella said in an AHA news release.

“We really need to better understand what gets bystanders to act, what gets bystanders to learn and refresh their CPR skills and the current ways to seek training in any given community,” Abella added.

Asked what they would do if they witnessed a cardiac arrest, 85 percent of respondents said they would be willing to call the EMS.  Roughly 35 percent would provide rescue breaths, chest compressions or use an automated external defibrillator. However, only 15 percent said they would be willing to do all of the above, according to the study.

Krogh called it “surprising” that only about 35 percent of respondents would actually start CPR.

“The willingness to perform CPR is very dependent on the knowledge about CPR,” Krogh said. “With this study, we can get closer to strategies to increase the knowledge about CPR and focus CPR training among the elderly.”

SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, Nov. 12, 2016

Posted in Blog by twila
September 22, 2016

We R CPR is proud to support Comfort Keepers Feed Seniors Now Food Drive  in partnership with @Chattanooga Area Food Bank September 19-30. Stop by We R CPR and drop off non perishable food item OR donate on line using the Chattanooga Food Bank Virtual Shopper. Please mention when asked if you have a special purpose for your donations, just add “Comfort Keepers Food Drive”

AT THIS LINK:

https://donatenow.networkforgood.org/chattfoodbank

Posted in Uncategorized by twila
February 1, 2016

True or False?

Every year, 1 in 4 deaths are caused by heart disease? TRUE!

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States.

Learn to save a life, learn CPR.  The Life you SAVE could be that of a loved one.

Posted in Uncategorized by twila
October 30, 2015

Halloween is a favorite holiday for many children, but it’s one that can make Mom and Dad a little nervous. Today’s HSI blog offers up some tips for parents on how to handle the costumes that might impair vision, the sharp pumpkin carving knives, and the worry about having the kids out in the dark.

Masters of Disguise

When it comes to costumes, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) offers the following suggestions on their website:

  • Plan costumes that are bright and reflective. Make sure that shoes fit well and that costumes are short enough to prevent tripping, entanglement or contact with flame.
  • Consider adding reflective tape or striping to costumes and trick-or-treat bags for greater visibility.
  • Because masks can limit or block eyesight, consider non-toxic makeup and decorative hats as safer alternatives. Hats should fit properly to prevent them from sliding over eyes.
  • When shopping for costumes, wigs and accessories look for and purchase those with a label clearly indicating they are flame resistant.
  • If a sword, cane, or stick is a part of your child’s costume, make sure it is not sharp or too long. A child may be easily hurt by these accessories if he stumbles or trips.
  • Obtain flashlights with fresh batteries for all children and their escorts.
  • Do not use decorative contact lenses without an eye examination and a prescription from an eye care professional. While the packaging on decorative lenses will often make claims such as “one size fits all,” or “no need to see an eye specialist,” obtaining decorative contact lenses without a prescription is both dangerous and illegal. This can cause pain, inflammation, and serious eye disorders and infections, which may lead to permanent vision loss.

Pumpkin Art

  • Small children should never carve pumpkins. Children can draw a face with markers. Then parents can do the cutting.
  • Consider using a flashlight or glow stick instead of a candle to light your pumpkin. If you do use a candle, a votive candle is safest.
  • Candlelit pumpkins should be placed on a sturdy table, away from curtains and other flammable objects, and should never be left unattended.

Pumpkin Art Safety

The Big Event

Over at Safe Kids Worldwide, you’ll find some excellent advice on how kids, parents, and drivers can all stay safe during the prime trick-or-treating evening hours:

  • Cross the street at corners, using traffic signals and crosswalks.
  • Look left, right and left again when crossing and keep looking as you cross.
  • Put electronic devices down and keep heads up and walk, don’t run, across the street. (Distracted walking — yes, this really is a thing. )
  • Teach children to make eye contact with drivers before crossing in front of them.
  • Always walk on sidewalks or paths. If there are no sidewalks, walk facing traffic as far to
 the left as possible. Children should walk on direct routes with the fewest street crossings.
  • Watch for cars that are turning or backing up. Teach children to never dart out into the street or cross between parked cars.
  • Review with children how to call 9-1-1 if they ever have an emergency or become lost.

And drivers, please be extra vigilant! Take it super slow and leave the texting for when you are out of the car and enjoying some candy with the kids back at the house. That is, if they’ll share it with you….

Have a great Halloween everyone!

Come Learn CPR/AED

Posted in Uncategorized by twila
October 1, 2015

Do you know the difference between cardiac arrest and a heart attack?

What is cardiac arrest?

When cardiac arrest strikes, the heart stops. Completely! This is due to an electrical malfunction in the heart that results in an irregular heart beat and the heart being unable to pump blood to the rest of the body. Symptoms of cardiac arrest come on very suddenly. A victim of cardiac arrest will immediately become unresponsive, and without treatment, death can occur within minutes.

What can to you do to help?

• Call 911

• Perform high-quality CPR, pushing hard and fast on the chest to help move blood through the heart into the rest of the body.

• Use an automated external defibrillator (AED), if it’s available, and administer a shock if necessary.

What is a heart attack?

A heart attack occurs when blood flow to the heart is impeded due to a blocked artery. Symptoms of a heart attack can vary, sometimes coming on suddenly and sometimes starting slowly and persisting for hours, days, or weeks. They can include pain or discomfort in the chest, back, or jaw; shortness of breath; cold sweats; and/or nausea and vomiting. Unlike with cardiac arrest, the heart does not usually stop beating. If the artery is not unblocked quickly, the section of the heart not receiving oxygen-rich blood because of the blockage begins to die. The longer a person goes without treatment, the greater the damage can be.

What can to you do to help?

• Call 911

Posted in Uncategorized by twila
October 1, 2015

Do you know the difference between cardiac arrest and a heart attack?

What is cardiac arrest?

When cardiac arrest strikes, the heart stops. Completely! This is due to an electrical malfunction in the heart that results in an irregular heart beat and the heart being unable to pump blood to the rest of the body. Symptoms of cardiac arrest come on very suddenly. A victim of cardiac arrest will immediately become unresponsive, and without treatment, death can occur within minutes.

What can to you do to help?

• Call 911

• Perform high-quality CPR, pushing hard and fast on the chest to help move blood through the heart into the rest of the body.

• Use an automated external defibrillator (AED), if it’s available, and administer a shock if necessary.

What is a heart attack?

A heart attack occurs when blood flow to the heart is impeded due to a blocked artery. Symptoms of a heart attack can vary, sometimes coming on suddenly and sometimes starting slowly and persisting for hours, days, or weeks. They can include pain or discomfort in the chest, back, or jaw; shortness of breath; cold sweats; and/or nausea and vomiting. Unlike with cardiac arrest, the heart does not usually stop beating. If the artery is not unblocked quickly, the section of the heart not receiving oxygen-rich blood because of the blockage begins to die. The longer a person goes without treatment, the greater the damage can be.

What can to you do to help?

• Call 911

Posted in Uncategorized by twila
September 2, 2015

If you need to save a life, just press on the chest fast and hard
In a major 2010 change, the American Heart Association said that rapid, deep presses on the chest of an adult cardiac arrest victim until help arrives, works just as well as standard CPR for one lay rescuer.
Experts hope bystanders now will be more willing to jump in and help if they see someone collapse. Hands-only CPR is simpler and easier to remember and removes a big barrier for people skittish about mouth-to-mouth breathing.
You only have to Call 911 and push hard and fast on the middle of the victim’s chest.
Hands only CPR for lay rescuer calls for:
Uninterrupted chest compressions 100 times a minute, until EMS workers take over or an automated external defibrillator is available to restore a normal heart rhythm.
This action should be taken only for adults who unexpectedly collapse, stop breathing and are unresponsive. Most likely that the person is having cardiac arrest.

Posted in CPR by twila